Hospital Landscape Kotamobagu

A Landschap in the Netherlands Indies was a self-governing administrative unity. As the decentralization policy of the NI Government progressed, not only regencies, municipalities or provinces, but also Landschappen took over existing hospitals from the central government. One of the examples was the Landschapsziekenhuis Kotamobagoe in North Celebes, which was mentioned in a Memorie van Overgave (Transfer of Office) of May 1941 from the Resident M. van Rijn to his successor F.Ch.H. Hirschmann: in the section about medical ressorts a paragraph was included of the existing hospitals. It reads:The Landschapsziekenhuis at Kotamobagoe had to be completely renovated in 1936 because the buildings were ruinous. At the same time the capacity was reduced to 35 beds. The equipment and the interior was very simple, but meets the demands. A government indigenous doctor has been charged with the Public Medical Service in the health ressort Bolaang Mongondou and with the management of the Landschap hospital of the main town Kotamobagoe and with the supervision of the polyclinics of the Landschap ((p.128) at Inobonte, Bintacano, Boroko, Kotaboenan en Molibagoe (south coast) at least 6 times a year the colony Ajong; he visits the north coast 4 times a year and the companies Polger and Riontong  since these have been put under government Besides, he visits regularly the convicts facility on the road Inobonto-Kwandang.

From Gonggryp 1934:
This subdepartment and Landschap of the residency Menado is administrated by a Controller BB. The subdepartment is divided into the Landschappen Bolaang Mongondou, Bolaang Oeki, Bintaoena, en Kaidipan -besar, each ruled by a radja. The population mainly is moslim and related to the  Minahasans and the Gorontalese. The languages of these groups are also similar. The subdepartment has 72,000 inhabitants, of whom 125 Europeans and 850 Chinese.

See also General hospitals 1940 – Google maps, for the location of town and hospital.

 

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